Nevada to embark on new sex offender registry system, but critics say it’s overly harsh

Supreme Court of Nevada building

Nevada Supreme Court Building

Starting Oct. 1, Nevada will be implementing its version of the federal Adam Walsh Act, a law that significantly changes the way the state classifies its more than 7,200 sex offenders. Rather than categorizing them according to their projected risk of reoffending, they’ll be categorized according to the original crime they were convicted of — a process that will reshuffle thousands of them and lead to many having their names, addresses and pictures on a web-based sex offender registry for the first time.

The article gives as an example the following example:

Under the Adam Walsh Act, he’ll be moved from Tier I to Tier III — the category reserved for the most serious offenses — and have his name, photo and address posted on the online sex offender registry for the first time. He’ll also be subject to “community notification” if police choose to pursue that, meaning authorities could knock on his neighbors’ doors or send postcards to people who live or work nearby and warn them that he’s in the area. He fears that will lead to him losing his business and his wife being harassed at her workplace.

Read the entire Nevada Independent article here. This is an in-depth analysis of the current situation in Nevada with the Adam Walsh Act implementation and how it will affect people.

5 comments for “Nevada to embark on new sex offender registry system, but critics say it’s overly harsh

  1. Unconstitutional
    October 1, 2018 at 5:05 pm

    This is unconstitutional garbage. How the heck can you retroactively increase someone’s punishment?!?! Generally new laws are passed to ease the “ignorance” of hypocritical law makers and help the “criminal”. I cannot believe this has gone into effect. What the heck is going on in this state? What a disgrace and a disgusting piece of legislation. John Walsh, father of Adam Walso, should be an “offender”. Just another lying hypocrite writing laws that they are guilty of breaking.

  2. Harold Krieg
    October 4, 2018 at 2:19 pm

    2 questions/comments

    1st – How are lawmakers allowed to change the sentences? Isn’t re-sentencing/changing the sentence similar to double jeopardy.

    2nd – If there is this type of registry, why isn’t there a registry listing the names of, showing the pictures of, and listing pertinent information of those people who knowingly file false sex crime charges against innocent people.

  3. troy
    October 18, 2018 at 6:09 pm

    Isn’t this b/s? I was hit with 18 months extra time when parole hearing came about. My first offense. it was then said to be the crime. Humm! Same as the AB 579 to change from a tier 1 to tier 3. Talk about double jeopardy.

  4. Rob
    February 27, 2019 at 5:32 pm

    Doctors of psychology attend 10 years of school, plus a year of studying for licensing. Why would you take away the examination of these professionals and base recidivism solely on a crime? Because politicians have a platform and SO’s have no voice or excess funding to combat them. And let’s look at recidivism anyways. Look up the stats. Check it out. You’ll see that those who already went through the punishment have an extremely low recidivism rate, EVEN HIGH TIER 3 OFFENDERS! But read the research and study! Anyone can skew data with many variables to get higher percentages, so please read the complete study to find the truth.
    As for the effects of the bill, everyone who hasn’t committed another sex crime is minding their business, awaiting the lengthy years to get off the registry, and now they are charged GUILTY with more punishment and have to extend their registration. You know what leads to recidivism? Ask a psychologist like I did and find that EXCESSIVE PUNISHMENT does. But with all those minding their business and doing the right thing and putting it behind them to become productive members, they get the blame and held accountable to even more punishment. They went through the system and received a sentence, why is the double jeopardy harming and nothing is done? Why do so many have to now get GPS over it? They were caught, they are trying to move on, and now the tax payers are funding those on a registry to get tracked even more. It’s the ones who haven’t been caught that are committing more and more crimes. So you want to bring in excessive punishment for these offenders. Okay. Then from date XX/XX/20xx anyone caught doing this will get these punishments. Don’t go back and ruin more of people lives for more punishment. Most never had to have a picture posted and created families. This huge movement is going to promote vigilante’s to go witch hunting and cause harm to innocent families who had been dealing with the stigma long enough. Spouses, children, parents, siblings, and immediate family members now get more stress from this law changing tier ratings. Many have lost jobs because of this. Many will think it attempt suicide from this. Many might say “screw it”, just give up and become homeless. There are so many predictable fall outs, but it’s totally okay… They are only sex offenders, they aren’t people.

  5. Bob
    April 1, 2019 at 10:06 am

    Unconstitutional!!! Under Cruel and Unusual Punishment. No due process. Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And if course double jeopardy.

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